The Pros and Cons Of The Corner Lot

The corner lot is a prized piece of real estate. Is living on the corner really all that it is said to be? The truth is that there are both pros and cons to buying the corner lot. Breaking down the pros and cons of the corner lot can help you to make an informed decision on your home purchase.

The Upside

There’s so many advantages to living on the corner lot. Living on the corner lot feels like you’re living on more space. Corner lots also enable you to have a garage on the side of the home, because you have roads on both the front and the side of the home. Wrap-around porches are a reality on corner lots due to their design. The ultimate privacy is also available on the corner lot, since you only have one neighbor on one side of the house. These are definitely pros for people who are looking for privacy. This gives your family flexibility to use both the front and the side yard with ease. There’s so many things you can do with the extra space on the larger side yard like put up a basketball hoop, plant a garden, or set up a volleyball game. The possibilities are endless.

The Downside

There are some downsides to living on the corner lot. First, there’s a lot more to landscape. With more yard, this only stands to reason. You want your yard to look even and flow beautifully with the way it’s landscaped, so there’s a bit more work to be done in this area. This landscaping work includes trimming, mowing, irrigating and maintaining. Your garage or driveway will also be affected by owning the corner lot. Since it may be set back more from the street, entering and exiting your driveway will be challenging in some cases. You also need to be mindful that your car isn’t edged out into the sidewalk or the road when it is parked. Another downside to the corner lot is that it’s often more expensive since it’s usually a more versatile piece of land.

While privacy is a plus on the corner lot when it comes to neighbors, privacy could be a negative for these homes depending on the location. Noise and privacy concerns are a must consider when it comes to homes in certain locations because the amount of traffic (whether by vehicle or by foot) can cause some disturbances to you and your family. To remedy this problem, you may consider installing fencing or other landscape buffers. These privacy concerns may not be as much of an issue depending upon the design of the home. If you consider where the entrances to the home are as well as the location of the garage, the house could be perfect for your needs.

No matter where you choose to live, pay special attention to the lot surrounding the home before you decide to buy. It’s important to choose to live in a place where you’ll feel comfortable and happy.

Places You’re Forgetting To Clean In The Kitchen

Your kitchen is probably the room that you clean the most often. From dirty pots and pans to spilled food and drink to loading the dishwasher, there’s always something to clean in the kitchen. While you may wipe up the obvious places day after day, you may not notice the areas where dirt and grime tend to accumulate. Whether it’s the places you’re often surface cleaning or other “hidden” places in the kitchen, you’re sure to find something that needs to be cleaned and has been overlooked in the kitchen. 

Places Most Often Cleaned In The Kitchen


Sink 

Stove

Countertops

You’re probably already wiping these areas down at least once a day. They are the most used parts of the room. But, are you cleaning them well? Is there grime building up around the edge of the sink? Have you cleaned off the drain stopper recently? Has the space under the countertops been wiped down to eliminate dirt and grime? While we tend to focus on the visible parts of these areas, we really need to be focusing on the invisible parts. This is where the real dirt and grime build up over time. If you haven’t cleaned these areas in a while, or (gasp) you’ve never done cleaned them, you’ll find they’re pretty disgusting and need a little extra attention. 

The Space Between

While you may clean the front of your refrigerator, you probably neglect the sides of the fridge. Also, don’t forget the refrigerator door handles. These can be  real breeding ground for germs and dirt. Grease, grime, and dust can also build up on the sides and on the floor along the sides of the fridge. A place to pay special attention to would be the space between the fridge and the counter. Even the floor space there. Also, don’t forget about the creases in your counter, and even in your flooring (depending on the type of floor you have). Crumbs can get lodged in these crevices and cause a buildup. One of the simplest ways to clean these spaces is to wrap a butter knife around a cloth and run it around the edge of the creases. 

Don’t Forget Your Small Appliances

It’s important to remember to clean in and around your small appliances in the kitchen every so often. Empty the crumb tray from your toaster. Wipe under the toaster, coffee maker, and knife block. Use something like an old toothbrush to get at any hard to reach places.

If you give your kitchen a deep clean every so often, you’ll save yourself from a kitchen with a lot of hidden dirt and grime.

You’ve Hired a Real Estate Agent to Sell Your House: Now What?

Let’s face it – in today’s fierce real estate market, home sellers need any competitive advantage that they can get. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available to ensure that you can maximize the value of your residence.

After you hire a real estate agent, the home selling may move quickly. In fact, the most common steps associated with the home selling process include:

1. Prepping Your House

As a home seller, you’ll want to do everything possible to ensure that your residence looks great both inside and out.

Your real estate agent can help you prep your house before it is listed on the housing market. He or she may offer tips about how you can transform your home’s ordinary interior into an exceptional one. Plus, your real estate agent can put you in touch with home cleaning companies, landscapers, painters and other home improvement professionals who can help you take your home’s appearance to the next level.

2. Hosting Open Houses and Home Showings

Open houses and home showings represent essential parts of the home selling and homebuying cycles. For home sellers, these events enable you to showcase your residence to a large group of homebuyers quickly. Meanwhile, open houses and home showings enable homebuyers to browse a wide range of properties without delay.

Your real estate agent will keep you up to date about open houses and home showings. This real estate professional will always provide you with sufficient notice any time a homebuyer wants to check out your home as well.

Hosting open houses and home showings can be stressful, particularly for home sellers who have already committed substantial time and resources to improve their properties. Fortunately, your real estate agent will set up plenty of open houses and home showings to generate substantial interest in your property. He or she also will share homebuyers’ feedback with you, ensuring that you can complete myriad home maintenance and upgrade projects as needed.

3. Responding to Home Offers

After your home reaches the real estate market, it may be only a matter of days before you receive your first offer.

Your real estate agent will inform you about any offers on your residence, and you likely will have 24 to 48 hours to determine whether to accept, decline or counter a homebuyer’s proposal.

Although you only have a short amount of time to assess a homebuyer’s offer, your real estate agent is happy to help you determine how to proceed. This real estate professional will enable you to establish realistic expectations for your home before you list your property. That way, you’ll be able to see how your home stacks up against the competition and price it properly.

Furthermore, your real estate agent will negotiate with a homebuyer on your behalf. And if you don’t feel comfortable with an offer on your home, your real estate agent will respond to a homebuyer’s proposal accordingly.

There is no need to stress when you sell your home. If you hire an experienced real estate agent, you should have no trouble accelerating the home selling process and optimizing the value of your residence.

Single-Family – 3 Drexel Ter Lynn, MA 01905 is now new to the market!

Backstreet West Lynn neighborhood dead end off of one way street sites this colonial with two separate lots.First floor has entry foyer, livingroom w/bay window, open to Diningroom w/BI china. Eat in kitchen with pantry and pass through rear hall to enclosed rear porch.Second floor has three bedrooms and full updated bathroom w/ open hall at top of stairs. Mostly newer vinyl tilts, Older FHA by oil furnace, updated circuit breaker panel, washer/dryer HU in basement. Separate lot at end of street holds four or more cars parking or other recreational use. One parking space in front of house; additional parking may be created to the right of the house. Open front porch at entry; screened rear porch egress to patio. House needs some updating and cosmetics. Pull-down stairway to attic. Convenient to public transportation, shopping, etc. Only a couple blocks to Lynn’s coming Market Basket store.

This is a Colonial style home and features 6 total rooms, 1 full bath, 3 bedrooms, 0.03 Acres, and is currently available for $249,900.

For complete details click here.

Five Common Moving Day Mistakes to Avoid

Moving is stressful. You have to worry about cleaning out your old home, preparing your new one and all of the logistical headaches that come with it. If that weren’t enough, you still have to balance your work and family life with the demands of moving into a new home.

With all of those factors taken into account, it’s easy to make mistakes on moving day. Today, we’ll cover five of the most common mistakes people make while moving to a new home and how to avoid them.

1. Thinking you don’t need help

None of us want to burden our friends or our wallets for moving. But unless all of your belongings fit in a suitcase and you’re moving to a furnished apartment you’re going to need some help. Whether it’s friends, family, or professional movers, make sure you have enough people to help you with the moving process. Don’t worry, you can repay them with free food or a good tip accordingly.

2. Assuming your help is reliable

If you’re counting on friends and family to help you move, check in with them a few days in advance to make sure they’re still available. Give them details for the exact time and place they’re needed. As a courtesy, order everyone pizza at the new house in exchange for their help.

If you’re hiring a mover, do some research before you commit to one. Read customer reviews and testimonials, make sure they have all required licensing, and so on. Call to confirm on the day before the move to make sure no mix-ups have been made.

3. Not taking traffic into account

If you and your movers are on a deadline, take traffic into account for your move. Do a test run along the moving route during the hours you’ll be traveling to find out how long it will take. This will also help you plan out stops for gas if needed.

Another good practice is to print out directions to the new home and give them to everyone who will be driving. This way you and your moving van know exactly which route to take.

4. Forgetting overnight necessities

Necessities like a tooth brush, deodorant, soap, and cell phone charger should be packed in a separate bag that stays with you. This way it won’t get lost among your boxes and regardless of where you’re sleeping that night you’ll know where to find the important items you need.

5. Not planning for their pet

Moving your belongings is easy, but moving your pet will require extra planning. You’ll have to ready your crate, pet food, toys, litter box or dog bags, and anything else your pet needs.

You’ll also need to look out for your pet during the move since doors will be opening and closing and they’ll be in a new (potentially frightening) environment. If you can, have someone pet sit for you on moving day. If that isn’t possible, keep the pet in an empty room with everything they need until you’ve settled in, checking up on them periodically.

Things That Shouldn’t Influence Your Home Buying Decision

Many first time home buyers go into the market looking for the home of their dreams. They picture a house filled with their favorite furniture, illuminated by plenty of natural lighting, and highlighted by bright and cheery wall colors.

While it’s good to have aspirations for your new home, it’s also important to remember that the house you’re buying is essentially a box. Sure, you’ll put plenty of nice things in that box, but ultimately you want to make sure it’s a sturdy box that’s in good shape before thinking about the contents.

When shopping for a new home, here are some things you shouldn’t let influence your decision.

Walls and carpets

It can be off-putting when you go and view a home and the walls are covered in antiquated wallpaper or painted a color you can’t stomach. It can also be hard to ignore, since the walls make up such a large, visible portion of the house. Instead, try to envision the room with the walls painted the colors you would use.

If a home has a carpet that looks straight out of the 70s it can definitely be a distraction and give you trepidations about the house. However, just like walls, this is a relatively simple fix if you have the budget for it. Imagine how the room would look with hardwood floors, tile, or a carpet that’s more to your liking.

An unkempt yard

The first thing you see when arriving at a house is the yard and driveway. Maybe the grass hasn’t been mown in a while, the mulch is looking faded and there are weeds growing up along the walkway. These are all aesthetic problems that can be easily and, if planned correctly, inexpensively fixed.

A good rule is to determine if the parts of the yard you dislike can be cleaned up in a few afternoons or if they would require a lot of time and money.

It feels like someone else’s home

Viewing a home can be awkward. If the seller still lives in the home you might feel like you’re intruding. In some cases, they could even be at home while you’re viewing the house. As you walk through the home, be sure to remind yourself that if you lived here the picture frames would have your family photos in them instead.

Similarly, if the seller has (to put it nicely) a “different” taste in decoration it can seem distracting and off putting. Fortunately, they’ll have to take all their decorations with them when they move–even that wall mounted deer head in the living room.

Decide based on these factors instead

Now that we’ve talked about the things to ignore, here are the details you should look for when shopping for a new home.

  • Size. The size of the home, the rooms, the yard, and the driveway will all be a huge factor in your decision.
  • Architecture. Take note of how the home was built and if there are certain architectural aspects that you love or hate.
  • Windows and lighting. Natural lighting is an oft overlooked feature that really enhances the atmosphere of a home.
  • Plumbing and electrical. Make sure you’re happy with the condition of the home’s HVAC, plumbing, and electrical systems because these will be time consuming and expensive upgrades.
  • Kitchen and bathroom features. Look for a home that has the kitchen and bathroom design elements you love, the space you need, and the features you desire (appliances, shower type, sink type, etc.)